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APeelingLeaving2020FindingPurposeSalesTipsDigital MagazineAppeal to the marketplaceJanuary 2021

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Publisher: MarketAPeelEditor: Shanon PeelDesign: Shannon PeelAPeeling Magazine is published byMarketAPeel939 Homer Street Unit 411Vancouver, BC V6B 2W6778-839-0521Copyright 2020 MarketAPeel.All rights reserved. No part of thismagazine may be reproduced intoany information retrieval systemswithout the written permission ofMarketAPeel. The publishers are notresponsible in whole or part for anyerrors or omissions in this publication.All opinions and views are those ofthe writers and not of the publisher.ISSN:  

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Photo by Blake PeelShannon’sThoughts
I went to bed early on December31, 2020 and woke up when the cityaround me went crazy. First, it was a party horn be-ing blown, then the screams of cel-ebration, followed by “Happy NewYear” hoots and hollers. The soundebbed and owed as other buildings,streets, and neighbourhoods joinedtheir voices in celebration. Thedowntown core of Vancouver wasvibrating with energy at the end of2020 and the beginning of 2021. It displayed how we can cometogether to create something biggerthan ourselves. The instigator blew their partyhorn outside the window, then camethe people who like to encourageothers to participate. They were fol-lowed by those who enjoy participat-ing. Then there are those like me,who sit quietly on the fringes taking itall in as the observers and recorders. As I lied their half asleep, Ismiled because the noises of othersenjoying themselves reminded me Iam not alone and am a part of a larg-er vibrant community. When we feel connected andare a part of something, we knowwe matter. Without this we becomedisconnected, withdrawn, lonely, anddepressed. We look at our life as apointless rut going nowhere and webecome lost. We all need to know wehave a purpose in life. For some, their purpose is rais-ing the next generation. Others wantto change the way we live, with newinnovations and ideas. A few dedi-cate their lives to social change andhelping the less fortune. Everyone’spurpose is different and unique. Embrace Your Purpose.The Apple Peels arelink buttons.

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I made changes to help readers nd the stories they want to read. First Section Each page is the start of an article so you can see if you want to read more of it. At the bottom of each page is a peel to click to go to the full article. Second SectionThis section is two pages listing the contributors and the clients of MarketAPeel who are featured in this issue. Click on the images to go to the appropriate pages.Third SectionThis is where the articles start and you can experience the magazine one page at a time.Click the Peel to go to section oneClick the Peel to go to section TwoClick the Peel to go to section ThreeHow to NavigateAPeeling Question for You

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Know those people who knew what they wanted to be at the age of 10 and were hyper fo-cused on how to be that per-son, have that job, and made it all look so easy? If you are any-thing like me, that is not what happened. Most people strug-gle to nd their purpose in life and work at a job they could nd instead of the one that lls them with a sense of purpose. What is purpose? Simon Sinek wrote a whole book and nding our “Why,” our reason for being, our purpose. He says our, “WHY is the purpose, cause or belief that drives every one of us.” He helps people understand why they get up, go to work, and nd passion in their daily lives to help orga-Finding Your Life’s PurposeClick the Peel to continue readingby Shannon Peel

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Why Teams Need Candor I spend a lot of time speak-ing with leaders at different stages of their careers, across industries and sectors and from companies at various stages of maturity. I ask many of them to share their top leadership lessons and challenges. One theme that comes up often is being honest in giving difcult feedback. One senior leader, who has had a long career in a large organization, shared that one of their greatest leadership challenges has been helping their colleagues address their blind spots. While this leader came to recognize that being direct in giving feedback was a responsibility that comes with Click the Peel to continue readingby Shakeel Bharmal

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Colleen loves Real Estate it’s more than a career, it’s a passion she has enjoyed for 16 years. She likes to help those who need her expertise in contract law and real estate. Colleen’s service is for everyday peo-ple who are selling the home they’ve lived in for a lifetime, people who are new to Can-ada, or someone who is just starting out on their home own-ership journey. Selling or buy-ing a home might seem straight forward, but it is lled with many pitfalls if the contracts are short on details and don’t ac-count for the what ifs that hap-pen in life. Meet the Realtor: Colleen ShorterClick the Peel to continue reading

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You Got to Feel it to Heal it Everything we want is outside of our comfort zone and will bring up uncomfortable or un-pleasant feelings as we go for it. If you’re like I used to be, any time you feel an uncomfort-able feeling, you try to move yourself to a better feeling place. Sometimes that might mean doing something con-structive to try to change your feelings. Or you may have learned to positive your way around “bad” feelings aka spiritual-ly bypass. Spiritual bypass is when you use spiritual princi-ples or personal development Click the Peel to continue readingby Alaina Schwartz

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  In his twenties, with a wife, a newborn, and a toddler de-pending on his income, JordanUytterhagen did what mostconsider unthinkable, he left asecure job with a governmentagency to start Cadence Solu-tions an IT consultant rm. During his time workingwith the municipality, he wit-nessed the inefciency of largevendors processes, brokenpromises of their sales teams,and the waste of resourcespushing a project over budget.He believed there had to be abetter way and he was goingto provide it. What he didn’tforesee was how frustratingit would be to compete withStaying True to His ValuesClick the Peel to continue readingby Shannon Peel

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Cold Calling Best PracticesChoose the phone – it may seem silly but train yourself by using the phone to gain con-dence. For regular everyday tasks consider using the phone rather than an email or text. Write your script by sitting down and planning what you want to say. Rehearsing the script makes it seem more natu-ral when you call. Put the script in front of you to stay on track. The beauty is they cannot see what’s in front of you. Consider this, which is worse, sounding scripted or, muddling your way through it? Practice - Rehearse your internal script with the best version of yourself, share what Click the Peel to continue readingby Craig Lovell

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There is only one reason small businesses fail — NO SALES. Without sales there is no cashow and without cash-ow there is no business. Most small business owners and en-trepreneurs are not professional sales people, they are better at doing what they are selling, not selling what they do. Since they need to work on their projects, they cannot be in ‘sales’ mode all the time, which results in a feast and famine existence. They get the client, focus on the work, and stop lling the sales funnel. Proj-ect comes to an end and they have no prospects in the pipe-line. This is a common cycle for Sales? Shoot me NowClick the Peel to continue readingby Shannon Peel

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Thank You CoronavirusStrange, isn’t it? To be gratefulfor a pandemic that killed overa million people? While I am heartbroken forall of the lives that have beendevastated by this virus, I amalso so grateful for what it hasprovided in my life. Over thepast seven months, I, alongwith the entire planet, havegone through many stages. Denial of the magnitude ofthe situation. Fear of, well, ev-erything! But also, relief to bequarantined and locked awaywith my family. You see, I spentso much of my life busy, withmy schedule packed full. Therewere days I’d leave the houseat 7am and not return untilClick the Peel to continue readingby Marjorie Chapman

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From Singapore to Spain to Senegal to Saskatchewan, it’s something we’ve all been ea-gerly waiting to do. To cast this monstrosity of a year into the dustbin of history, and get back to life as we once knew it. But leaving 2020 is more than simply a turn of the calendar, ushered in with socially-distant champagne drunk through a mask. It’s a state of mind. It’s leaving behind the crushing weight of hopeless-ness, sadness, despair, discon-nection and depression that have been the dening hall-marks of 2020. Hallmarks that I became intimately acquainted with over Leaving 2020Click the Peel to continue readingby Geoff Woliner

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Meet Lindsay Oh my head. The light’stoo fucking bright, fucking sun.Hangovers are the worst.I roll over and who is this? My hands connect witha hard body. I open my eyes.Well he’s cute at least. Maybe25. He’ll wake up all hot to trotand my head feels like a freighttrain ran over it. I got to gethim out my condo without toomuch fuss. I roll over. My eyesbegin to focus. Where the hell am I? It looks like a dorm room.Really, a dorm room? I’m at theUniversity? Well this is the onlyway I ever get on campus. Shit.I slip out of bed and try to lo-Turn it OffClick the Peel to continue readingBy Shannon Peel

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What is your life’s purpose? Know those people who knew what they wanted to be at the age of 10 and were hyper focused on their purpose in life and made it all look so easy? If you are anything like me, that is not what happened. Most people struggle to nd their purpose in life and live the life that found them instead of the one that lls them with a sense of purpose. There is nothing wrong with work-ing for the sake of a paycheque so you can pay the mortgage and pay for your kid’s hockey or dance class. Your pur-pose isn’t always in your paying work. What is purpose? The dictionary says purpose is the reason something exists. According to the University of Minnesota, purpose can guide life decisions, inuence be-havior, shape goals, offer a sense of direction, and create meaning. Other denitions I found are, a goal or inten-tion, a plan to do something, the things we strive for, and determination. My fa-vourite denition, purpose is the reason we do something. Simon Sinek wrote a whole book on nding our “Why,” He says our, “WHY is the purpose, cause or belief that drives every one of us.” He helps people under-stand why they get up, go to work, and nd passion in their daily lives to help organizations move forward. His popu-larity is a sign that people are seeking purpose, a reason for living, and to know what they do matters.How can you know what your purpose is?You feel jealous Have you ever cringed with dis-comfort and envy when someone told you what they did for a living or how Finding YourLife’s PurposeBy Shannon Peel

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they were changing the world? Do youwish you were? When I met someonewho was a writer, I’d have a gut wrench-ing physical reaction. Yet, I would pushthe idea away and continue to live thelife I had, not the one I needed.Is it a Hobby? Do you spend your free time onthe fringes of your purpose? My hob-bies were like putting a toe in the waterof storytelling. It wasn’t a waste of timebecause the skills I taught myself, cametogether to enable me to design digitalmagazines and write the stories to pub-lish inside of them.Do You Feel Joy? When we feel joy, we are livingwithin our purpose. When my kids weregrowing up, I felt joy every momentthey were with me. For a period of timemy only purpose was to be a motherand I loved my time with my kids. Then they grew up and needed meless and less and I needed a new pur-pose. Finding my purpose wasn’t easy.Do you Lose time? When you are engaged in doingsomething do you lose track of timeand become so focused on what youare doing, you forget to eat and push

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until you fall asleep? When I’m writing, I lose time and I forget everything around me because I am getting the thoughts out of my head and onto paper. .What did you do as a kid? Think back to when you were a kid, spending time on your own, what did you do? I spent a lot of time alone as a kid because of where we lived and my personality. When I think back to how I entertained myself, the ribbon woven throughout my childhood is story. I was always telling myself stories. Recently, my mom and I were go-ing through my memory box to purge stuff from her basement and she found these books I’d written in elementary school. The memory of writing them made me happy. Thankfully, I was 6 hours away watching her go through the box via zoom, because if I’d been there, we never would have gotten any-thing done. I would have sat down with those stories to relive them and been inspired to go upstairs and write. Scared to fail? Is there something you wish you could do, or you want to do, but you don’t because let’s face it, if you fail then that’s the end of a dream? Some-times having the dream keeps us safe from ever having to do it because we can say, “I could have been a <insert

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your purpose> if I’d really wanted to.” By doing nothing, we can blame others and circumstances for never em-bracing our purpose instead of trying and learning that we never had what it took to be <insert your purpose>. I could write as a hobby and make scrap-books, read stories, and continue with-out ever being a writer or storyteller. I could play it safe because the choice to be a writer is always there and there is no evidence saying I wasn’t any good. For years, I hide from my purpose because I was scared others were right and I wasn’t good enough to be a writer. Yes, people did tell me I wasn’t good enough and I believed them. I’d allowed knee jerk comments to hold me back for too long. If you aren’t living your purpose because you are scared you will fail, be embarrassed, or lose something – you’ve already lost. I know I’m a writer because I keep writing and putting it out there into the most judgemental and cruel of places - the Internet. I can’t stop. I am compelled to keep trying. What Happens when you Hit a Wall? Everything we do has prob-lems that need to be xed and sacrices which need to be made. If the sacrices and problems drain you and leave you rolled up in a ball hiding in the closet from them, then it isn’t your purpose. When I was writing Thirteen and That’s Life, (formally 40 some-thing) the problems were moving the storyline forward, the sacrice was time, the risk was rejection.

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Make an Impact You are here on this earth for a short period of time and yet your choic-es will leave a big impact on future generations. Is there something you are passionate about and want to change in the world? Is there something you want to leave for your children or grandchildren? I have always loved history and the story of humanity. When I was in London UK, I saw a wall built a thou-sand years ago and whoever built it made an impact on this world. They built something that I could touch a millennium later. The wall is proof of their existence, though I don’t know their names or their stories, they mat-tered. They did something to move hu-manity forward and to remind us they lived. Some are driven to make a bigger and longer lasting impact, so they seek to change the world, fame, or innova-tion. Others are content with mattering only to their partners and their children. Whatever your purpose is, it is evi-dence that your life matters.When in Doubt, Try. You don’t know until you try. Go out and do different things until you nd the thing you like to do. Today, you have the internet to nd groups, classes, and ideas. Throughout history, people gured out what their purposes were without the resources of today. If you always wanted to be a dancer but you never took a dance class, how do you know that is truly what you want to do? Take some class-es and see what happens. You may not become a Prima Ballerina, that takes dedication, youth, natural talent, and Subscribe to APeeling

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super-human focus. However, there areother ways to fulll your purpose. I applied for writing jobs. I triedto get the gatekeepers, agents, andhiring managers to see my purpose.They didn’t. Many said I wasn’t goodenough, but I kept going and then oneidea led to another one, which led tosomeone who believed in me. NowI’m publishing APeeling and creatingmagazines for professionals who havea brand story to tell the world. Sure, Ididn’t become my generation’s versionof Hemingway, but I still can say I’m awriter and have a purpose..When I Retire What are you waiting for retire-ment to try? There is no guaranteeyou’ll make it to retirement and the waythe world is going many of us will neverbe able to retire, unless we want to livein abject poverty. So, why wait? You don’t have to make a livingout of your purpose. It can be a hob-by or a cause you volunteer for. Lotsof people work to earn a living so theycan live their purpose on weekends.
When we don’t Live our Purpose. When things fall apart or youcontinue to come up against brick wallafter brick wall no matter what you do,life might be telling you something.When my life was in transition and Ididn’t know my purpose, I felt like theball in a pin ball machine being thrownfrom one thing to the other and nevergetting anywhere. I was meant to be a writer. I amsupposed to be telling stories. Eventhough others were not willing to hireDownloadFinding YourPurpose WorksheetNo email - free no strings

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me as a writer, I am still doing it. I found a different way where I did not need the approval of gatekeepers or hiring managers. My purpose is to record real sto-ries by real people with real solutions for life and work. The platform and community I create will impact the world positviely and help others when they are struggling through the difcult times in their lives. We all need a reason for living, a purpose, a why. The thing which gives our lives meaning and makes an impact on the world. Figuring out what will bring meaning to your life is a process. It can take time for the stars to align and life to open the door to opportunity. Until then, know your existence matters and you have a purpose for being here.Like this article? Share it ->Click Peel to Comment

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I spend a lot of time speak-ing with leaders at different stages of their careers, across industries and sectors and from companies at various stages of maturity. I ask many of them to share their top leadership lessons and challenges. One theme that comes up often is being honest in giving difcult feedback. One senior leader, who has had a long career in a large organization, shared that one of their greatest leadership challenges has been helping their colleagues address their blind spots. While this leader came to recognize that being direct in giving feedback was a responsibility that comes with leadership, it never got easier. Another leader, who is at an earlier stage in their leader-ship career, indicated that their greatest challenge is managing staff performance issues, partic-ularly related to behaviour and conduct. They are still working their way through this and ex-perimenting with different ways of speaking their mind. For me, giving difcult feedback has required a delib-erate effort and development. I have become stronger at it with experience and age, but I am still studying the art of being honest and direct in delivering difcult feedback. I expect that this is true for many people. Whether it be at work, in volunteer roles or with friends and family, we are not always honest with our feed-back. There is a built-in dilem-ma in our lives.Why Teams need CandorBy Shakeel Bharmal

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On the one hand, in order to achieve the best possible outcome, to collaborate well and solve problems effective-ly, we need full information and open sharing of views and ideas. Misleading and withhold-ing information and feedback is detrimental. On the other hand, so-cial forces work against always being honest. We sometimes rationalize that the reason we hold back from giving difcult feedback is that we don’t want to offend or be impolite. Other times, our fears and the lim-bic-driven instinct for self-pres-ervation holds us back. Ed Catmull, President of Pixar and Disney Animation, in his book Creativity Inc., dives into this topic to share how his com-pany attempts to overcome lack of honesty – which he re-labels ‘lack of candour’ – in the service of producing the best possible movies. He says, “A hallmark of a healthy, creative culture is that its people feel free to share ideas, opinions, and criticisms. Lack of candour, if unchecked, ultimately leads to dysfunction-al environments.”

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He acknowledges that there may be good reasons to be careful about what you say. A person may want to be polite or respectful or they may not want to appear to be a know-it-all. More often, though, hold-ing back comes from fears of saying something ‘dumb,’ of being judged or of an emo-tional reaction or retaliation. Catmull says that these are the tendencies his team works hard to overcome at Pixar. Brené Brown, the vulner-ability research professor, has commented on this in her work as well. Her ndings are that delivering honest feedback requires a balance between both courage and vulnerability. It makes sense, right? Giving honest feedback requires put-ting yourself in an uncertain po-sition. You don’t know how the other person is going to react, so you feel vulnerable. Doing it anyway requires courage. A few years ago, Google initiated a study called Project Aristotle to understand why some work teams were more effective than others. The goal Listen

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was to gure out how to pre-dictably create the perfect team. There were many hypoth-eses prior to completing the study: better to put introverts together, perfectly balance individual competencies, put highest performers together, people that got along socially work together more effectively, etc. After studying 180 teams, researchers could not nd a consistent pattern based on any of the hypotheses. What they did determine was the most effective teams. The most important dynam-ic was “psychological safety,” which Harvard Business School Professor Amy Edmondson de-nes as “a belief that one will not be punished or humiliat-ed for speaking up with ideas, questions, concerns or mis-takes.” Putting it all together (Cat-mull, Brown, Google) suggests that the most effective teams are made up of people who have the courage to be vul-nerable and have leaders and members who explicitly discuss and re-enforce norms of psy-chological safety. Not easy to do, but worth the effort!Read more about CandorLike this article? Share it ->Click Peel to Comment

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Worldto impact theLive withPurpose

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Meet the RealtorColleen Shorter Colleen loves Real Estate it’s more than a career, it’s a passion she has enjoyed for 16 years. She likes to help those who need her expertise in contract law and real estate. Colleen’s service is for everyday peo-ple who are selling the home they’ve lived in for a lifetime, people who are new to Canada, or someone who is just starting out on their home ownership journey. Selling or buying a home might seem straight for-ward, but it is lled with many pitfalls if the contracts are short on details and don’t account for the what ifs that happen in life.

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She went to school to study law where she earned a parale-gal diploma and then worked for a large real estate developer. Experience on the developer side of Real Estate gave her an insight into strata plans and de-tails like airspace, commercial entitlements, covenants, ease-ments, and statutory right of ways. She understands how all these legal rights will affect the sale of the home or the lifestyle of the purchaser. She knows what to look for to ensure her clients are protected. Real Estate is complicated and too often a buyer doesn’t know what questions to ask to ensure they will not be on the hook for an unforeseen expense or living in a strata that restricts their lifestyle. Colleen knows what to look for, how to write a good contract, and has ad-vanced training in real estate law to help her protect her client’s interests. There is more to selling a home than exchanging cash for keys. The process can be frus-trating and if one is not careful, it could cost you more than you expected. Discover why she loves Living in Vancouver’s North Shore.Look Inside

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About Cameron Chell Cameron Chell is considered a ‘serial entrepreneur’ with his rst ventures beginning at age 14 and a trajectory in business that spans more than 25 years. He is the co-founder and CEO of the Business Instincts Group (BIG) and BUILD Impossible. He has launched numerous successful tech start-ups such as Dragany Innovations (CSE: DFLY) (OTCQB: DFLYF), ColdBore Technologies, Raptor Rig, Urthe-cast, KODAKOne and Currency-Works (TSXV and OTCQB: CWRK). His entrepreneurial success is based on principles of clear vision, quantiable results and tireless pur-suit of goals. A sought-after speaker, Chell has addressed audiences of thou-sands in settings around the world. His presentations include speeches at the United Nations, Tony Rob-bins, and TEDx Montreal Women. His talks touch on themes ranging from technology to homelessness as he shares his life experiences of overcoming hurdles and doing “the impossible.”Cameron Chell Gets Schooled

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Everything we want is out-side of our comfort zone and will bring up uncomfortable or unpleasant feelings as we go for it. If you’re like I used to be, any time you feel an uncomfort-able feeling, you try to move yourself to a better feeling place. Sometimes that might mean doing something con-structive to try to change your feelings. Or you may have learned to positive your way around “bad” feelings aka spiritual-ly bypass. Spiritual bypass is when you use spiritual princi-ples or personal development techniques to avoid facing your painful feelings, unresolved wounds, or unmet needs. It is a way to AVOID feeling the feels. It’s a state of resistance. And what we resist persists. I used to be the Queen of Spiritual Bypass, till I learned how to feel my feelings. When my dad passed last year, I felt grief, not just for my dad, but for the identity I cre-ated to constantly achieve to prove myself to my dad. I was afraid if I felt the full extent of my grief, I’d lose momentum in my business. I was afraid I’d be consumed by my grief. My coach at the time advised that grieving WAS my business. You’ve got to Feel it to Heal itBy Alaina Schwartz

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Contrary to what I believed, my business growth would be stied if I didn’t allow myself to grieve fully. It was painful, but the breakthrough that came as a result was profound. One of my clients recent-ly told me that she kept med-itating so she didn’t feel her anxiety anymore. The point of advising her to meditate was so she would feel her anxiety, not try to get rid of it. Once felt, it would quickly move on by it-self. We did the simple process below and in a matter of sev-eral minutes, she no longer felt anxious. Often, many people re-press difcult feelings or numb out with alcohol, drugs, TV, sex, shopping, etc. If we repress or numb out, it may ease the dis-comfort temporarily. Not only do the feelings NOT go away, but they get louder. It’s like holding a beach ball underwa-ter. The moment you stop hold-ing it down, it pops up and hits you in the face. From a Quantum Physics perspective, we are of .00001%

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matter and the rest (.9999%) energy. Thoughts and feelings are energy too. When we resist feeling an emotion that is un-comfortable or unpleasant, that energy gets stuck in our bodies rather than continuing to move through us. And the more you resist it, the more the energy gets dammed up in your body. As a result, it will stop the ow of energy moving through your body and you will feel worse. This is what causes most disease of the body and mind. Stufng your feelings will man-ifest in chronic stress, disease, emotional issues, relationship struggles, self-sabotaging be-havior, etc. So what do you do with all these feelings? You feel them to heal them! But what about the idea that what you put your focus on grows? If you focus on chal-lenging feelings, will you only experience more of them? Which is it? It’s both. I’m not suggesting setting up base camp with your feelings, only

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having tea with them and really being present with them. If you do this, you will move through your emotions in a constructive way. How do you do that? Here are 5 Steps to practice that will allow you to feel and resolve difcult emotions: 1. Become aware of what you’re feeling. You don’t need to label it. Just notice it...i.e., I feel this restriction and tight-ness. 2. Notice where you feel it in your body. Allow yourself to feel all the feelings and fo-cus your loving attention on the part or parts of your body where you feel it. For example, I feel this restriction in my bel-ly. It feels like there’s a ton of heavy rocks piled up in my bel-ly. Then focus your loving atten-tion on your belly. 3. Have compassion for yourself and anyone else in-volved. Everyone is truly do-ing their best based upon the world view they have at any given moment. 4. This next part may seem out there, but trust me it works! Speak to the feeling in your body. Ask it what it wants you to know? What would make it turn Think Differently

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APeeling Readers Leather Journal25% Discount Code: BookAPeeldown the volume? What does it need from you? It’s mind-blow-ing how much incredible action-able information comes from this Step 4. And the truth is, if you think you’re making it all up, it doesn’t matter. 5.If you get a response that’s vague, like lighten up, ask what that would specical-ly look like. Keep asking what it would look like until you get specic actionable information. If you trust this process, you will get some action to take, even if it’s get quiet and listen more, that will help resolve the feel-ings. Feelings are a barometer, they’re signals of what’s going on. When we learn to read the signs, they don’t need to stick around very long. Most importantly, be open. Getting comfortable feel-ing your feelings is like building a muscle. It takes time to devel-op the skills. Now, these steps are sim-ple, but not easy. And the rea-son they are not easy is we were not taught how to feel

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our feelings. So it feels uncom-fortable to feel our “negative”emotions. Spoiler alert: More oftenthan not, it’s not the feelingthat’s uncomfortable or pain-ful, rather it is the resistanceto feeling it. Once you meltyour resistance to feeling youremotions, you will realize thatthey are not the big monsterwe made them out to be. ANDthey will move through youpretty quickly. When I learned to startfeeling my feelings, I wasamazed at how quickly thosefeelings resolved. I’ve noticedthe same thing with my clientstoo. So I’m extending an invita-tion to you. Feel your feelings- ALL OF THEM! Without judg-ment.Like this article? Share it ->Click Peel toCommentSubscribe to APeelingAlaina Schwartz helpshigh acievers make a big-ger impact on the world.


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 In his twenties, with a wife,a newborn, and a toddler de-pending on his income, JordanUytterhagen did what mostconsider unthinkable, he left asecure job with a governmentagency to start Cadence Solu-tions an IT consultant rm. During his time workingwith the municipality, he wit-nessed the inefciency of largevendors processes, brokenpromises of their sales teams,and the waste of resourcespushing a project over budget.He believed there had to be abetter way and he was goingto provide it. What he didn’tforesee was how frustratingit would be to compete withglobal strong branded rms. He was working for a mu-nicipality in Alberta when thecity hired one of the big-name,Staying true to His ValuesJordan Uytterhagen

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global consultant rms to pro-vide a digital solution. Thecompany’s salesperson prom-ised their consultants would de-sign what the city wanted, andthey were the best in the eld. In the end the invoicesadded up to over three hun-dred thousand and there wasstill no solution to the problem.Leadership nally gave theirinside talent, who had neverattempted a project like it, achance to create the solution. Jordan and his team wereup for the challenge to learnopen text and design thesolution for far less of a costthan the consultancy rm hadcharged. Jordan realized that “Asa bunch of internal people do-ing this for the rst time, weexceeded the industry bar. Ifwe can start an organization todo this professionally, to ll thegap in the market, especially inWestern Canada where therewere no companies using opentext, we could be successful.”He left a secure position for athree-month contract in a dif-

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ferent city, promising his wife itwould work out. Cadence Solutions grewby word of mouth because Jor-dan stayed true to his values,consistently solved his client’sproblems with efcient, produc-tivity, time management, andbudget spending. One of theways he helped clients keepcosts down was to reduce theamount of time he and his teamtravelled to onsite locations. It is regular practice for thebig consultant rms to sendtheir IT people to work onsitein client’s ofces, the cost ofthis practice is then passedon to the client. At Cadence,they work remotely as much aspossible to ensure their talentis home more and they are notwasting their client’s money bypaying for unnecessary hotelsand travel. When Covid hit, hiscompany was able to provideseamless remote service whileeveryone else was still deter-mining how to transition. Jordan chooses not towaste a lot of time going head-to-head with the global rmson big government and corpo-rate contracts where contractsare awarded based on the sizeof the brand more than onWant to Share Your Story?

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credibility, efciency, or ability. He witnessed the bait andswitch tactics of the big salesteams who promised rst stringtalent to close a high-ticketcontract and then the companysent a different team who wasn’tprepared to do what was prom-ised. Jordan refuses to play thebait and switch sales game. Heknows he needs to raise the barin the industry by delivering ontheir promises and exceedingexpectations whenever possi-ble. Jordan personally presentsthe solution to his potential cli-ents to ensure the client under-stands what is being offered andhis team knows what is beingpromised. This way the transferfrom sales to development istransparent. Cadence’s company valuesare closely aligned with Jor-dan’s values of efcient produc-tivity and prairie farm boy workethic. He doesn’t waste thetime or resources of CadenceSolutions or its clients and ex-pects the same efciency fromboth his clients and staff so,they look for potential clientswho understand the cost-effec-tive approach of remote workand efcient productivity. They

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work with clients whose teamswork hard and get the job donebecause they are passionateabout delivering results. Jordan has walked awayfrom projects, even though themoney was excellent becausethe client didn’t align with theirvalue system. He wants to bechallenged and for his peopleto be constantly learning, in-stead of being a cookie cutterone-size-ts-all solution. He isbuilding a lifestyle for himselfand his people and he is notwilling to compromise his val-ues to obtain success. There are always lessonsto learn and that one thingwe wish we’d done differently,for Jordan, that thing is hiringgood people sooner. It tookhim a few years to learn how tohire the right people and as thecompany grew their needs intalent changed. At the begin-ning, projects needed someonewith more experience becauseJordan wasn’t able to train thenew hire on the technical as-pects of the projects. As thecompany grew, they were ableto hire recent graduates whowould learn on the job.
Jordan looks for two thingswhen hiring, can he trust the per-son and do they have a strongwork ethic. Trust is the numberone thing he looks for duringan interview and he sets the barhigh. The interviewee needs topass Jordan’s version of the pup-py test; would he trust the per-son to take care of his pets?Custom Designfor your branding Needs

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His employees become like family and he needs to know they are the kind of people who will care about each other and the job they are doing.Did the interviewee come pre-pared with a notebook, ques-tions, and a printed resume? He says that resumes tell him, “They’re all smart they graduated from the University of Alberta. You got to be smart to get in and you got to be smarter to get out.” As long as they have the education, they can do the job, but can they work at Cadence? He wants employees who are going to be around for lon-ger than a minute. During the interview he wants to learn what they do on the weekend, what they would do if a project is be-hind schedule, and how they react when a deadline is loom-ing. To determine if they want what Cadence has to offer he asks, “Where do you want to work and what type of work do you want to do?” The answers help him identify if they want what global rms offer in terms of lifestyle and money or if they want to be home more and work hard because they are pas-sionate about what they do.

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 He admits nding the rightpeople is hard and time con-suming, however, it is worth itbecause when you have theright team you can grow, dupli-cate, and delegate. Like many business own-ers, Jordan initially found del-egating difcult and riskedoverworking himself by takingresponsibility for tasks outsidehis role’s purview. The key todelegating he discovered washiring people whom he couldtrust to get the job done whenasked and didn’t need to bemicromanaged. When he start-ed delegating, every metric inhis business doubled, enablinghim to take on larger contracts. Jordan’s favourite projectsare the ones where he learnssomething new and solves aproblem for the client to maketheir work more efcient. Helooks to work with compa-nies who have a willingnessto change the way they dothings. Their ideal clients areopen to new ideas, value ef-cient productivity, and have ahttps://youtu.be/0NnkB2lSU8Q

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hard-working team who caresabout the outcome. They needa, “Just get it done” attitudeover the, “We’ve always done itthis way” mentality. The bulk of his clients arefrom the private sector. It istough to go head to head withglobal rms for governmentcontracts because they’ve havethe big brand name govern-ment managers like. Govern-ment agencies are not his idealclient because they are slowerto change, waste resources, areinefcient, and rife with the,“We've always done it this way”mentality.
These are all the reasons whyJordan made the right decision forhis career and his family by leavingthe safe government job. A careerwithin the connes of the PublicSector does not align with his corevalues of hard work and efcientproductivity. By staying true to hisvalues and starting a companyaligned to his own, he has built asuccessful IT Consultant Organi-zation that gives new graduates achance and provides a work / lifebalance for his employees.Discover how Candence Solutionscan help your organization.Like this article? Share it ->Click Peel toComment

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Before the Call Choose the phone – it may seem silly but train yourself by using the phone to gain con-dence. For regular everyday tasks consider using the phone rather than an email or text. Write your script by sit-ting down and planning what you want to say. Rehearsing the script makes it seem more natural when you call. Put the script in front of you to stay on track. The beauty is they can-not see what’s in front of you. Consider this, which is worse, sounding scripted or, muddling your way through it? Practice - Rehearse your internal script with the best ver-sion of yourself, share what excites you. Your passion and enthusiasm can go a long way. The more you practice the more fears and anxiety dimin-ish and your true self shines through. Make it a little warmer by researching the industry, com-pany, and contact. Use this in-formation carefully and don’t be presumptive. Assumptions will work against you. Environment - Find a quiet place without distractions and-plan your time to maximize your efciency and ensure you take breaks. Have your materials, your lists and call tracking sheets, at the ready. Cold Calling Best PracticesBy Craig Lovell

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During the Call Don’t lose them at “hello” – avoid being too fast, unclear, or not loud enough. Perfect posture, stand up, while calling people because you will speak more clearly. Smile, so your tone of voice is more natural and light-er. A smile will make you sound happier and the person on the other end of the phone will re-act positively to your energy. Be aware of the tone and volumen of your voice. Did you know that a raised voice at the end of a statement makes what you are saying sound like a question or you are unsure about what you are saying. Be an active listener, give them space and time to follow you. Learn to pause. A three second silence forces listening and allows for response. Learn to love objections, true objections are natural and are, in fact, a sign the other per-son is listening. Anticipate ob-jections and have a solution at the ready. Get curious, adopting a “curious mind” will help avoid

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being self-conscious and takes the focus off ourselves and onto others in a non-threatening way. Focus, when calling be ful-ly focused on task: Stay in the zone. Try calling similar cate-gories of contacts, structure an appropriate time and place, limit distractions. Track calls and results – CRM’s (customer relationship management programs) are an option but it doesn’t need to be complicated or sophisticated. Complexity = excuses. Just be consistent. After the Call Follow up - thank yous are im-portant. So is follow through on your “small ask” Review and revise your script - its never perfect. Use your notes to revise and get better. Celebrate your achieve-ments – be honest, this is hard work. Build in some rewards for yourself.As an instructor and facilitator, I design and deliver engaging work-shops on business fundamentals specically directed to youth... and the young at heart.Do you have sales tips or questions?Like this article? Share it ->

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APeeling members have access to acontent library lled with genericevergreen content which they can usefor their own social media posts    What you doin this momentwill determinewhat happenstomorrow

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There is only one reason small businesses fail — NO SALES. Without sales there is no cashow and without cash-ow there is no business. Most small business owners and en-trepreneurs are not professional sales people, they are better at doing what they are selling, not selling what they do. Since they need to work on their projects, they cannot be in ‘sales’ mode all the time, which results in a feast and famine existence. They get the client, focus on the work, and stop lling the sales funnel. Proj-ect comes to an end and they have no prospects in the pipe-line. This is a common cycle for small business. Smile n Dial My wonky career path has included professional sales, the smile and dial numbers game type of sales. I kicked butt at smilin and dialin, nding the de-cision maker, and getting in the door to meet. I had no prob-lem making 40-60 dials a day, regardless if the product was Advertising, Online Review Plat-form, Financial Planning prod-ucts, or Chinese Pump Jacks and Oil Pipe. I built qualied lists, found business, and even closed sales. Today, I am standing on the cliff edge. I know what my ideal audience looks like, I know where to nd them, and I know how to build a CRM database to manage these cold leads and guess what —Sales? Shoot me nowby Shannon Peel

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I’m frozen. It’s not the sub zero tem-peratures of a Canadian winter that have me covered in ice… It’s fear. OMG – I’m scared to pick up the phone. How did I go from a kick butt cold calling appointment setter to frozen solid on a cliff’s edge? What’s different? First, the product I am now selling is – me – and my con-dence took a hit during a long job search. I know I’m not the only woman to have an issue with self condence. It’s one of those things we were taught as young girls – “Don’t be too loud.” “Don’t toot your own horn.” “Don’t be so full of your-self.” Little boys were to cul-tivate condence, we were to cultivate coyness and virtue.Take the First Step The rst step is identifying who I want to meet. The key to getting an appointment is to not sell myself or my services. The only thing I want to sell is the appointment, so I have to have a good reason for them to meet with me. Researching to nd out why they want to meet me is easy. This is where social media and Google come in.

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Who do they know? What are they posting on social me-dia? What do their reviews say about them? And do they iden-tify a problem I can help them with? Too often sales profes-sionals hide behind research and dive too deep into the in-formation to avoid picking up the phone. As soon as you nd common ground, a reason for them to talk to you, - pick up the phone. If you can’t nd any-thing within 5 minutes, pick up the phone and ask if they have time to tell you about their business.Cold Calling Tips To be successful at smiling and dialing, the best thing you can do is warm up the lead. Leave a voicemail with your name and say you’ll call them back. You don’t want them to call you back because they will always call when you’re doing something else and you won’t remember who they are, not a good rst im-pression. By leaving your name you will start the process. Connect with them on social media by commenting on their posts. Liking is not enough to get noticed, you have to consistently comment.The rst call is always the hardest.

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Connect with people who might know them. You never know who will be able to intro-duce you. Send an email to their business - but only one - don’t spam the hell out of them. Find a reason to email them, and follow up with a call a few days later. SMILE. Stand up walk around and smile. Be happy. People want to talk to people who make them feel good, don’t over do it, be authentic and friendly.Hire a Professional There are contract sales professionals who help small businesses. The different types of contractors are: List Builders, will create call lists for you to call on. A good one will research each lead to ensure they meet your target market criteria. Appointment Setters, call your list and make appointments for you to talk to prospects and sell your product or service.Closers who will help you with the sales process and close the deal after you have presented all the options.Full cycle sales professional, will handle the full sale cycle from list to close. Account managers will man-age clients accounts and com-municate with them for as long as they are clients.Have sales tips or questions?

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A Digital Salesperson I created a multi-media sales presentation which guides readers through the benets, solutions, and the product like a real salesperson. Still, it takes an actual per-son to build the relationships that lead to sales. A digital salesperson is a tool sales a can use to support their efforts, not replace them. I chose to hire contract sales professionals because sales professionals keep their skills sharp and are pros at what they do. This enables me to be a pro at what I do and keeps the sales funnel full.

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Coming in

January 2021

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 Strange, isn’t it? To begrateful for a pandemic thatkilled over a million people? While I am heartbroken forall of the lives that have beendevastated by this virus, I amalso so grateful for what it hasprovided in my life. Over thepast seven months, I, alongwith the entire planet, havegone through many stages. Denial of the magnitude ofthe situation. Fear of, well, ev-erything! But also, relief to bequarantined and locked awaywith my family. You see, I spentso much of my life busy, withmy schedule packed full. Therewere days I’d leave the houseat 7am and not return until1am. The pandemic was a gift,that’s how I see it now. It forcedme to stop and focus on whatis really important. I realized Iwas lling my time with thingsthat made me feel like I was im-portant, not things I wanted todo. I’ve spent the past sevenmonths recalibrating and deep-ening my connection to myselfand my family. I’ve spent timehoning the “muscle” of check-ing with myself before sayingyes to anything. Sleeping.Breaking the habit of pleasingothers and developing the sub-tle ability to know the differ-ence. I’ve spent time with myself.Getting to know me. Declutter-ing the house and our land, aswell as my mind. Reading. Hav-ing those conversations thatThank you,CoronavirusMarjorie Chapman

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really matter with my family and friends. Reconnecting with other friends who have always been “too busy” and noticing where I’m holding onto silly things about people I really love, and calling them to tell them. And I’ve surrounded my-self with people who are doing the same, so the conversations I’m in are moving us all forward. There’s an allegory that goes around every once in a while, attributed to a Native American elder. It goes some-thing like this: A boy comes to the elder and says it feels like there are two wolves inside him, one who is light and one who is dark. He asks the elder how he will know which one will win. The response is, “The one you feed.” During this time, it’s easy to feed the darkness, the fear. It’s easy to feel like this year is surreal and signicant. And in many cases, it has had huge impacts on all of our lives. My family has been blessed to not be medically affected by Covid-19, but we have been impacted by its side effects: unemployment, crazy weather, and a child grappling with anx-iety and panic attacks. Still, I count us lucky. We have a roof over our heads, unemployment only lasted three months, and we have a strong community of support. Even so, this has been a rough time for us.

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What has allowed me to grow and succeed during this time is being acutely aware of the state of my mindset and to remember that I am not my thoughts, I can alter my thoughts. When I feel the worry and anxiety creeping in, sparked by the news or worry about my loved ones, I have picked up the phone. I tap into the skills of my own life coach to iden-tify what’s off screen running my show. This allows me to be and stay as empowered as possible. I’m choosing to have conversations that leave me empowered, and I only spend a little time in my conversations around the hot topics (and boy are there many!) so that most of the conversation is moving us both forward. I’m doing those things I have been putting off until “I have more time” and I’m making sure to do those things that I know feed my soul. I’m reminding myself to have grace for myself, my fam-ily members, and my friends. None of us know what to do or how to be during this time. We’re all brand new to this! You got this. We’ve got this. Find a way to tap into your silly side. Do those things you’ve always wanted to. Be kind and loving, to others and especially to yourself. Practice gratitude, and, when you are ready, maybe even nd some gratitude for all the craziness happening around you. Marjorie Chapman is the Head Coach and Owner of Love Out Loud Life CoachingLike this article? Share it ->

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Leaving 2020Geoff Woliner From Singapore to Spain to Senegal to Saskatchewan, it’s something we’ve all been eagerly waiting to do. To cast this monstrosity of a year into the dustbin of history, and get back to life as we once knew it. But leaving 2020 is more than simply a turn of the calendar, ushered in with socially-distant champagne drunk through a mask. It’s a state of mind. It’s leaving behind the crushing weight of hopeless-ness, sadness, despair, discon-nection and depression that have been the dening hall-marks of 2020. Hallmarks that I became intimately acquainted with over the summer. This past July, I hit a pro-found low point in my own mental battle to persevere through this year. I was able to get through the lockdowns of March and April with the belief that this pandemic would sim-ply be a bad memory by the summer. That, like a bad storm, it would arrive, leave a trail of carnage and tears, but then, like all storms, depart swift-ly and leave us to pick up the pieces. In July, it became abun-dantly clear that this storm made landfall, but had no plans on leaving any time soon. I had to accept the hard, yet unalterable truth that this would simply sit in place, and

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relentlessly wallop us with one lashing after another. We were going to be in for an endless parade of pan-icked headlines about spiking case numbers, more cancelled events and the probability of further lockdowns in the future.As an extrovert whose spirit is animated by live events, new experiences, and the energy of a crowd, this may as well have been a death sentence handed down by a medieval king. Be-cause while sheltering in place in perpetuity would save my body, it would undoubtedly kill my soul. So I had to get busy, and nd a way out. I couldn’t physically leave 2020 in July, so I had to discov-er another path. And, like many other tortured creatives, that path was writing book. I put out a call on LinkedIn for people to contribute their stories. What animated their souls? What got them out of bed in the morning? I needed to see if there was, in fact, any light left in this dark, defeated morass of a world. To my great (and thrilled) surprise, I received dozens of submissions from all over the globe. Thailand, India, the U.K., Kenya, and all points in be-tween. I wanted to tell their stories in a ctional book set against the backdrop of 2020. Where each of their stories would come to life in their own way, and help shine beacons of light into the darkness.

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The main character in the book is a journalist named Sean Gallo, a New Yorker who was hit especially hard in 2020 by losing his job, his connections, and his only living relative to Covid-19. His mental health, already shaken from decades of un-treated depression, was now sent over the ledge, literally and guratively. Sean could no longer nd the will to go on. Like so many others, 2020 had broken his spirit beyond the point of re-pair, and it was simply time to leave.Leaping from his building in Manhattan, he enters a mys-terious realm between life and death where he encounters all the aforementioned contrib-utors from around the world, each represented as a ctional character (but with their real rst names). They all arrive with a story, and a lesson. A way back into the light. A way to leave 2020, and re-discover what it truly means to be alive.To not simply exist – but to live. To create. To think. To dream. To love. To imagine. Writing “Leaving 2020” was my own way of actually do-ing so. It was a way of keeping my mind busy during the lock-

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downs, and to create some-thing that could hopefully help others who found themselves in a similar state. A way of letting them ex-perience their own journey through the eyes of Sean Gallo, and hopefully nd the inspira-tion to keep going through the utter hopelessness of a year with nothing to look forward to.This book, like smartphones, has planned obsolescence. The hope is that one day, 2020 is truly nothing more than a bad memory; something we look back on with incredulous disbe-lief, a shared illusion that we can’t believe actually happened. And that this book is noth-ing more than a curious time-piece that reects the state we were all in. Beaten, broken and desperately searching for something…anything…to get us to the other side. But until that day arrives, the hope is that we can collec-tively leave 2020. Before we get back to “normal”. Before the pandemic is over. Right here, right now. Together. Geoff Woliner, author of “Leaving 2020”, is the Founder and CEO of Winning Wit, a company that helps people deliver the best speeches and presentations of their lives, winning every big moment that comes their way. Geoff has been fea-tured on Fox 5 News, New York News-day, WTOP radio and a host of other outlets as a leader in speechwriting and presentation coaching, and is a native of New York City who really misses the pizza.Availableon Amazon

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Meet Lindsay Oh my head. The light’s too fucking bright, fucking sun.Hangovers are the worst.I roll over and who is this? My hands connect with a hard body. I open my eyes. Well he’s cute at least. Maybe 25. He’ll wake up all hot to trot and my head feels like a freight train ran over it. I got to get him out my condo without too much fuss. I roll over my eyes begin to focus. Where the hell am I? It looks like a dorm room. Really, a dorm room? I’m at the University? Well this is the only way I ever get on campus. Shit.I slip out of bed and try to lo-cate my clothes, which seem to be everywhere. Thank God the room is a closet and he sleeps like the dead. I can’t seem to nd my panties, was I wearing panties? I doubt it. Hell, if I was he gets a souvenir. Opening the door slowly, as not to wake the young buck, I slip into a hallway lled with young bucks. Damn. Well so what. I look as young as they do and they’d be lucky to get with a woman who knows her stuff like I do. I walk out of the building with my head held high. Shit, there are kids all over the fucking place. I need a drink. Can someone please turn off the fucking sun already?Fumbling in my purse I nd my phone and call a cab. I have Turn it offBy Shannon PeelThe Novel #ThatsLife was written as a serial series. Each Issue of APeeling will include a chapter for you to enjoy.

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got to stop drinking so much. I try to piece together last night. There was dancing and of course drinking, lots and lots of drinking. Who’d I start the night with? I check the calendar on my smart phone. Date with Joe and a number. I text.What the hell happened last night? He still hasn’t responded by the time to cab shows up. I feel too crappy to be angry.I call Charlie and tell her where I woke up. “What about this Joe guy? Where is he?” She asks. “I don’t know. I don’t remember much about last night.” I like to party. I party all the time, but I never get so out of control I don’t remember what happened. I’ve woken up in men’s beds plenty of times, but I always remember how I got there, eventually. Last night though is a complete blank. Damn I don’t even know if the kid was any good in bed, now that pisses me off. “What’s the last thing you remember? Think Lindsay.” “Drinks with Joe at that new wine bar downtown, the one we went to last weekend.” “OK then what?” “I don’t know. He was kind of awkward, just kept staring at me while I talked. He barely said two words. Just asked me Five Women Navigating Life in the 21st Century.

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questions and stared at me like I was the best thing he’d ever seen, and damn it, I probably was.” “Where did you go after drinks? Did you eat anything?” “I don’t remember food, I remember wine, plenty of wine. The waiter kept lling my glass. I think we left to go dancing. I remember dancing. I don’t know where. That’s it. I don’t re-member anything else. I sure as hell don’t remember hooking up with that kid.” “Well write it down. Get some water into you, better yet sports drinks, and write down what you remember. I’ll be by your place in an hour. Get cleaned up” That’s Charlie. She’s a law-yer. She’s always telling me to write it down. God like writing it down is the most important thing in the world. I’m not a fucking writer. “I’m ne.” “Good ‘cause you prom-ised to come with me for din-ner at my sister’s today.” Oh shit. I stumble into my condo, paid for by my lovely ass of a second husband, and drop into bed. Finally, someone turned the fucking sun off.

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Discover the APeeling Social Media Content PackageMonthly Content Package includes 10 social media postsGraphics PLUS a written story, a tweet, and writing prompts for each image for you to use on your social media platforms